JMSC at Hong Kong Book Fair

The JMSC had a strong presence at the recent Hong Kong Book Fair

HKU Press stall at the Hong Kong Book Fair

Hong Kong University Press, which publishes books written and edited by JMSC staff, did a roaring trade at the week-long annual fair which 920,000 people visited this year.

HKU Press publisher, Michael Ductworth, said that their best selling book at the book fair was Barry Kalb’s You Can Write Better English.

Kalb is an Honorary Lecturer at the JMSC. His courses focus on news writing and emphasise good written English.

His book is aimed at anyone wishing to improve their written English with a focus on common mistakes made by native Chinese speakers.

Two other JMSC written or produced books were on sale: The Soros Lectures: At the Central European University by George Soros (超越金融 – 索羅斯的哲學: 匈牙利中歐大學講座結集) which was edited by the JMSC and Investigative Journalism in China: Eight Cases in Chinese Watchdog Journalism which was edited by David Bandurski and Martin Hala.

David Bandurski is a Research Associate at the JMSC’s research and fellowship initiative, the China Media Project.

“China is one of the world’s toughest environments for journalists. But despite all sorts of dangers, restrictions and setbacks, Chinese professional journalists have managed to do some incredible work in the last decade, including in the area of investigative reporting,” says Bandurski.

“This book deals with some of the most representative cases of investigative journalism in China since the turn of the century, and along the way addresses some of the key challenges journalists face. I hope it gives readers a better understanding of how professional journalism is developing in China.”

JMSC books on sale at the HK Book Fair

Professor Ying Chan, the Director of the JMSC, and Qian Gang, the Director of the China Media Project, gave a talk at the Book Fair about the subject matter of their jointly edited book, China’s Bold Bloggers (中國猛博) which is published by Cosmos Books.

The book looks at blogging in the Mainland – how it is investigated and blocked by the government.

“China’s Bold Bloggers shows one of the lastest changes in contemporary China,” says Gang. “This change shows the awakening of citizens and the popularization of network technology. This book is a way to understand China.”

He explains why the fair is so important to authors: “The Book fair is a good platform for both finding a good book and as well as finding a good reader,” says Gang. “This is hasty and impetuous era, a lot of good books don’t get seen. So we seized this opportunity to introduce China’s Bold Bloggers to Hong Kong and Mainland readers.”